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BESPONSA™ (inotuzumab ozogamicin) Use in Specific Populations

8. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.1), Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)], BESPONSA can cause embryo-fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on BESPONSA use in pregnant women to inform a drug-associated risk of major birth defects and miscarriage. In rat embryo-fetal development studies, inotuzumab ozogamicin caused embryo-fetal toxicity at maternal systemic exposures that were ≥ 0.4 times the exposure in patients at the maximum recommended dose, based on AUC [see Data]. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, advise the patient of the potential risk to a fetus.

Adverse outcomes in pregnancy occur regardless of the health of the mother or the use of medications. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies are 2–4% and 15–20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In embryo-fetal development studies in rats, pregnant animals received daily intravenous doses of inotuzumab ozogamicin up to 0.36 mg/m2 during the period of organogenesis. Embryo-fetal toxicities including increased resorptions and fetal growth retardation as evidenced by decreased live fetal weights and delayed skeletal ossification were observed at ≥ 0.11 mg/m2 (approximately 2 times the exposure in patients at the maximum recommended dose, based on AUC). Fetal growth retardation also occurred at 0.04 mg/m2 (approximately 0.4 times the exposure in patients at the maximum recommended dose, based on AUC).

In an embryo-fetal development study in rabbits, pregnant animals received daily intravenous doses up to 0.15 mg/m2 (approximately 3 times the exposure in patients at the maximum recommended dose, based on AUC) during the period of organogenesis. At a dose of 0.15 mg/m2, slight maternal toxicity was observed in the absence of any effects on embryo-fetal development.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of inotuzumab ozogamicin or its metabolites in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for adverse reactions in breastfed infants, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with BESPONSA and for at least 2 months after the last dose.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, BESPONSA can cause embryo-fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1), Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating BESPONSA.

Contraception

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving BESPONSA. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with BESPONSA and for at least 8 months after the last dose [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

Males

Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with BESPONSA and for at least 5 months after the last dose [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

Infertility

Females

Based on findings in animals, BESPONSA may impair fertility in females of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

Males

Based on findings in animals, BESPONSA may impair fertility in males of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pediatric patients.

8.5 Geriatric Use

In the INO-VATE ALL trial, 30/164 patients (18%) treated with BESPONSA were ≥ 65 years of age. No differences in responses were identified between older and younger patients.

Based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis in 765 patients, no adjustment to the starting dose is required based on age [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

Based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis, the clearance of inotuzumab ozogamicin in patients with mild hepatic impairment (total bilirubin less than or equal to ULN and AST greater than ULN, or total bilirubin greater than 1.0–1.5 × ULN and AST any level; n=150) was similar to patients with normal hepatic function (total bilirubin/AST less than or equal to ULN; n=611). In patients with moderate (total bilirubin greater than 1.5–3 × ULN and AST any level; n=3) and severe hepatic impairment (total bilirubin greater than 3 × ULN and AST any level; n=1), inotuzumab ozogamicin clearance did not appear to be reduced [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

No adjustment to the starting dose is required when administering BESPONSA to patients with total bilirubin less than or equal to 1.5 × ULN and AST/ALT less than or equal to 2.5 × ULN [see Dosage and Administration (2.3)]. There is limited safety information available in patients with total bilirubin greater than 1.5 × ULN and/or AST/ALT greater than 2.5 × ULN prior to dosing. Interrupt dosing until recovery of total bilirubin to less than or equal to 1.5 × ULN and AST/ALT to less than or equal to 2.5 × ULN prior to each dose unless due to Gilbert's syndrome or hemolysis. Permanently discontinue treatment if total bilirubin does not recover to less than or equal to 1.5 × ULN or AST/ALT does not recover to less than or equal to 2.5 × ULN [see Dosage and Administration (2.3), Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

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